The History of Wigan Volume 1 David Sinclair

ISBN: 9781230216126

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

98 pages


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The History of Wigan Volume 1  by  David Sinclair

The History of Wigan Volume 1 by David Sinclair
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 98 pages | ISBN: 9781230216126 | 9.26 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER V. MissingMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER V. Missing Sectors--Pympton--Fulshaigh--The Bankes of Winstanley--Upholland--Monasteries--First M.P.s and their Payments--Clyderhou--Wycliffes Opinion of Parsons--Charter Restored--Clyderhous Father.

fROM the combined information derived from the lists of rectors which I have seen, the first three are John de Mansel, who was rector before 1249, when he granted his parish charter- Adam de Waleton, rector in 1292, when he was tried at Lancaster, and lost the borough charter- and then Robert de Clyderhou, who was instituted to the living on 22nd September, 1303.

It is very evident that, during that period, there must have been other rectors- and I now submit to the reader two names more, with my reasons for presuming that they were rectors in that period. Frederick Peake, Esq., of London, has, amongst other charters belonging to the Standish family, one from William, the son of William de Standish, to--Pympton, chaplain of Wigan, in which William de Standish is a witness. The charter is dated 28th Edward I., that is, ten years after the disgrace of De Waleton.

There was only one church in Wigan, and that All Saints, with which Pympton must have been connected, and, although he is only here called chaplain, he may, nevertheless, have been rector. Although the rectors often absented themselves for very long periods, I believe he was neither a mere locum tenens nor a priest after the order of the modern curate.

Had he held any subordinate ecclesiastical position he would not have been recognised by such a high family as that of the Standish es, especially in the matter of an important charter. The Standishes were one of the most wealthy and aristocratic families of the neighbourhood at this period, and held many possessions in the...



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